DOC700 UOPX Week 1 Technology Training Problem in Profession Summary

DOC700 UOPX Week 1 Technology Training Problem in Profession Summary

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Running head: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 1 DOC/700 – Week 1 Rubric Statement of a Problem CONTENT CRITERIA Follows directions Executive Summary template utilized Paragraph consisting of 125 words or less Problem Problem identified Barely Problem aligned with program of studies Inknown, as it is not mentioned. APA FORMATTING Doctoral Level Title Page Times New Roman 12 pt Double Spaced and Indented Paragraphs 5 – 7 sentences per paragraph APA STYLE Proper Grammar Proper punctuation Total Points Comments: Follow directions carefully. Refrain from submitting more binformation than what is due. Label assignment after saving correctly. Executive Summary David Johnson III University of Phoenix POSSIBLE POINTS POINTS EARNED 15 15 15 15 20 4 20 0 5 5 5 5 5 5 5 4 5 5 100 5 5 63 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2 Executive Summary The most significant issue educators in technology are facing is the lack of education students possess on ways to avoid social media pitfalls, which can potentially ruin theirs lives Teaching students Internet etiquette is an essential skill students must learn students need to be taught at a young age. Identified Problem The problem is what specifically do students need to learn, how does it need to be taugh, and who should teach it.. This is what was due this week. DOC/700 – Week 1 Rubric Statement of a Problem CONTENT CRITERIA Follows directions Executive Summary template utilized Paragraph consisting of 125 words or less Problem Problem identified Problem aligned with program of studies APA FORMATTING Doctoral Level Title Page Times New Roman 12 pt Double Spaced and Indented Paragraphs 5 – 7 sentences per paragraph APA STYLE Proper Grammar Proper punctuation Total Points Comments: POSSIBLE POINTS 15 15 20 20 5 5 5 5 5 5 100 POINTS EARNED Running head: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Executive Summary David Johnson III University of Phoenix 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 2 Executive Summary As educators in technology, the most significant issue we are facing our students were not appropriately educated on how social media affects and can ruin students lives through negative posting and circumstances at hand. This issue goes hand-in-hand with educational technology. Teaching students what is proper to post on Internet sites is an essential skill that must be learned at a young age. Seventh graders are the biggest victims and corporate of publishing negative information about their classmates and other students. Over the last two years, I had an opportunity to teach students what was appropriate to post on social media sites. Identified Problem As a doctoral professional, you will be challenged to leverage your skills as a scholarpractitioner-leader to inform interventions that affect positive change in your professional discipline. During week 1, you identified a problem in your professional discipline to use as a focus for the assignments in weeks 2, 3, and 4. After incorporating the feedback from your facilitator, place your revised identified problem in this section. Background of the Problem The foundation for UOP’s doctoral practitioner program is the Scholarship, Practice, and Leadership (SPL) Model. In week 2’s assignment you utilized the ‘scholarship’ piece of the SPL Model to provide background to the identified problem by locating and using peer-reviewed literature to substantiate that the problem exists. After incorporating the feedback from your facilitator, place your revised week 2 discussion in this section. Contradictions in the Literature EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 3 As a ‘practitioner’ in the professional field, you have identified a problem and substantiated the problem by analyzing peer-reviewed literature. To address biases and/or counter arguments for the identified problem, week 3’s assignment required you to analyze and evaluate additional peer-reviewed literature to address contradictions. After incorporating the feedback from your facilitator, place your revised week 3 discussion in this section. Implications to Leaders The final piece of the SPL Model is ‘leadership’, and week 4’s assignment required a discussion focused on how leaders in your profession might benefit from addressing the problem to initiate change in the workplace. After incorporating the feedback from your facilitator, place your revised week 4 discussion in this section. Reflection on the SPL Model Throughout DOC/700 you have identified a problem in your professional field, through a ‘scholarship’ lens you provided background to the problem by analyzing peer-reviewed literature, as a ‘practitioner’ you began building and substantiating an argument by analyzing and evaluating additional literature, and through a ‘leadership’ lens you synthesized how a leader in your profession might benefit from addressing the problem or by implementing an organizational change. In this section, add a self-reflection on your understanding of the SPL Model and how you might integrate this model into your professional practice. You may use first person in your self-reflection. Note: Self-assess each weekly assignment description to ensure you have met the objectives for each assignment. References EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 Note: the journal, book, and dissertation sections are examples of how each type of publication is formatted, and the reference section should not be divided as this seems to indicate. All references are placed in alphabetical order by authors’ last names. Formatting of Journal Articles: Author, A. (2013). Title of article is written in sentence form with proper nouns being capitalized. Title of Journal in Italics as is the Volume Number, 31(22), 345-354. Author, B. (2000). Title of article is written in sentence form with proper nouns being capitalized. Title of Journal in Italics as is the Volume Number, 31(22), 345-354. Note how the issue number and page numbers are not in italics. Refer to the APA Manual, pp 198-202 for journal article formatting. Formatting of Books: Author, C. (1998). Titles of books are written in sentence form and placed in italics. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association. Refer to APA Manual, pp 202-205 for book formatting. Formatting of Dissertations: Author, A.A. (2003). Title of doctoral dissertation (Doctoral dissertation). Retrieved from ProQuest (or the name of the database). (Order number or AN number) Refer to APA Manual, p 207 for dissertation/theses formatting. DOI Numbers Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) is a fairly new system and journal articles have been, or are in the process, of being identified with a doi number. As an author, one of your responsibilities is to see if an article has been assigned a doi number, and if not, then you need to provide a direct link to the article, instead of providing a URL to a secured database. APA stated to avoid providing a URL to a secured database, such as ProQuest, EbscoHost, contentproxy.phoenix.edu, etc. If your reader is interested in researching one of your references and doesn’t have access to a secured database, then that individual will not be able to ‘easily’ locate the article. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 5 Sometimes we must hunt a little to find a doi number or a direct link. When you see ‘searchproquest’ in a link, then you know the link is to a secured database, and a database the ‘average’ person will not have access too. The APA Manual provides more information on how to locate doi numbers for articles on pages 189-192, but the basics are: Crossref Use Crossref Metadata: https://search.crossref.org (you will want to create a bookmark for easy access in the future, as you will be using this frequently) When you click on the link, you will see a search bar. Copy/paste, or type in, the title of the article and hit ‘enter’. If the article you are using has been assigned a doi number, the article will usually be the first one listed in the results. If your article doesn’t show up in the search, then that article has not been assigned a doi number yet. Journal Website If the above doesn’t provide a doi number, APA provided 2 examples in section 7.01, subsection 3: Journal article without DOI (when DOI is not available). Please refer to the examples in the manual on page 199. More information on the use of doi numbers is in the APA Manual on pages 188-192. Running head: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 6 Appendix Analytical Framework Topics Criteria – References Example Topics Criteria Best practices Tech in math classes (look for specific technology applications used in math classes) Prof. development (look for literature focused on PD best practices specifically for math educators) Nspire Navigator software increased levels of interactivity: engagement and dialogue about math problems (Lucas, 2013) Interactive technology fosters identity development by use of student communities (Lucas, 2013) Teacher-Leaders: Problem-Solving Cycle (PSC) model using video-based discussions in PD to implement math curriculum incorporates collaborative work, can be tailored to goals, interests, and needs (Borko, 2017). Flipped classroom: integration of videos for individual learning prior (homework) to interactive learning (classroom) (Bergmann & Sams, 2014). Types of professional development Achievement levels: high schools (look for Pre/post achievement levels: Use of specific technology, i.e., flipped classrooms, different software applications, etc.) – EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Achievement levels for the state of Texas 7 Before technology integration, HS grade levels showed a decrease in math scores in 2015 compared to 2013 (Caverly, 2017). Flipped Classroom: student grades 10% higher than traditional classroom for bottom third of class (Caverly, 2017) References Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2014). The flipped classroom. Computer Science Education, 17(3), 24-27. Retrieved from https://www.acsi.org/Documents/Professional%20Development/CSE17.3%20-%20Bergmann%20-%20The%20Flipped%20Classroom.pdf Borko, H., Carlson, J., Mangram, C., Anderson, R., Fong, A., Million, S……MuroVilla, A. (2017). The role of video-based discussion in model for preparing professional development leaders. International Journal of STEM Education, 4-29. DOI: 10.1186/s40594-017-0090-3 Caverly, G. (2017). A technology leader’s role in initiating a flipped classroom in a high school math class (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (#10745078). Lucas, R. (2013). Restructuring high school math learning spaces with interactive technology and transformative pedagogy (Doctoral dissertation). Available from ProQuest Central; ProQuest Dissertations & Theses Global. (# 3601712). Paragraphing with the MEAL Plan M- Main Idea Every paragraph should have one main idea. If you find that your paragraphs have more than one main idea, separate your paragraphs so that each has only one main point. The idea behind a paragraph is to introduce an idea and expand upon it. If you veer off into a new topic, begin a new paragraph. E – Evidence or Examples Your main idea needs support, either in the form of evidence that buttresses your argument or examples that explain your idea. If you don’t have any evidence or examples to support your main idea, your idea may not be strong enough to warrant a complete paragraph. In this case, reevaluate your idea and see whether you need even to keep it in the paper. A – Analysis Analysis is the heart of academic writing. While your readers want to see evidence or examples of your idea, the real “meat” of your idea is your interpretation of your evidence or examples: how you break them apart, compare them to other ideas, use them to build a persuasive case, demonstrate their strengths or weaknesses, and so on. Analysis is especially important if your evidence (E) is a quote from another author. Always follow a quote with your analysis of the quote, demonstrating how that quote helps you to make your case. If you let a quote stand on its own, then the author of that quote will have a stronger voice in your paragraph (and maybe even your paper) than you will. L – Link Links help your reader to see how your paragraphs fit together. When you end a paragraph, try to link it to something else in your paper, such as your thesis or argument, the previous paragraph or main idea, or the following paragraph. Creating links will help your reader understand the logic and organization of your paper, as well as the logic and organization of your argument or main points. Reference Duke University (2006). Paragraphing: The MEAL plan. Retrieved from https://twp.duke.edu/uploads/assets/meal_plan.pdf
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